In Art, Literature, Philosophy on
April 24, 2017

To Be or Not to Be Bohemian

On a spring day in 1423 in the Kingdom of Bohemia (modern day Czech republic) a declaration was made and a letter signed which stated that Bohemia was officially a sanctuary state for illegal Roma immigrants, and asked that others throughout Europe treat these people with the same hospitality:

We, Zikmund, King of Hungary, Bohemia, Dalmatia, Croatia, …, Our loyal Ladislav, Duke of his Gypsy people, humbly beseeches us for affirmation of our special leniency. Receive then his civil appeal and don’t refuse this letter. In the case that the aforementioned Ladislav and his people appear in whichever place in Our Empire, in any town or village, we recommend that you show to him the loyalty which you would show to us. Protect them, so that Duke Ladislav and his people may live without prejudice within your walls.”

As these immigrants traveled from Bohemia throughout Europe, they became known as Bohemians.  They were nomadic by nature, and quick to assimilate into the cultures they traveled to.

Fast forward 500 years to a spring day in another sanctuary state: California. A group of journalists gathered in the Astor hotel in San Francisco to start a club comprised of artists, authors and philosophers whose aim it was to leave the cares of the urban world behind them and reflect on the higher things that made life worth living. The club needed a name that aptly described its members and its mission. It became known as “The Bohemian Club”.

Isn’t it interesting how words are shaped and evolve through time to express ideas, and communicate thoughts and feelings? Bohemian. Think it. Say it. What comes to your mind? Maybe you think of the peace, love, and Donny Osmond era; San Francisco flower children; and lots of macramé.  Maybe you only go back that far. Back to the 70’s when the word Bohemian was synonymous with the word Hippie.

Or, maybe you go further back. Back to the roaring 20’s; back to Zelda and Scott Fitzgerald, flapper culture and feminist awakenings; back to anti-establishment speakeasies and abstract art. That was a time when cubism was just coming onto the scene, and philosopher Albert Camus’ absurdist writing was giving a voice to what many were contemplating about existence.

Or, maybe you stay right here in the present day. You think about digital nomads, location independence, and hipsters dressed in Urban Outfitters chic.  Side question…are hipsters really Bohemian? Or, are they Fauxhemian (posers trying to look like the real thing)?

What does Becoming Bohemian even mean? Can it be clearly defined? Is the fact that there is no clear definition itself descriptive of what a Bohemian truly is: something that has no box, no home, and no label? While difficult to pin down with any degree of specificity, one common thread woven through history as far back the Kingdom of Bohemia emerges, and that thread is freedom. Bohemianism is all about freedom: freedom from oppression, freedom of thought and expression, and freedom to explore the world.

I want to become Bohemian because I want to be truly free.  I want to become Bohemian because I want to live rather than simply exist. I want to become Bohemian because I honestly don’t see any other alternative. This is the lifestyle I wish to cultivate. If the ultimate existential question is “to be, or not to be”, the answer to all of that existential angst, I am convinced, is to become Bohemian.

I plan to explore Bohemianism through the lenses of my Bohemian Idols: artists, thought leaders and philosophers, innovators, world travelers and anthropologists. I will write about my findings here.

Do you want to join in the quest to Become Bohemian? Subscribe to be a part of the community, and receive our monthly newsletter. In addition, if you have a Bohemian Idol you think I should research, please let me know in the comments below.

Yours freely,

~Bohemian in Training~

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